This job was my first break into the big leagues.  I had done many custom kitchens on my own at this point, but this was on another level, and scared me a little.  It was decidedly over my head at the time, but that is how I have always operated and learned.  Just say yes, and figure it out.  With well over 100 kitchens in my rear-view mirror, and the confidence that has brought, I can happily report that anxiety is not often a part of the experience any longer…

 Let’s dig into the details that made this a “hard” kitchen… the bridge over the TV is a nearly 9’ span.  We used wall mounted supports from Countertopbrackets.com to prevent sagging.  Every one of the columns and floating shelves in that area were mitered on their long edge by my CNC fabricator.  Doing this with a regular table saw would have produced lackluster results, so I was happy to outsource that part.  Actually… all of the parts here were fabricated by them, and the precision required to pull off a job like this cannot be understated.  The install has got to be perfect and the parts need to be perfectly square.  But I digress.  The doors on either side of the little wine fridge are stainless.  These are by Danver Stainless.  If you need stainless doors, just go straight to them, as they are very cleanly made, not that expensive, and have an MDF core which will accept Blum hinges. The island had to be in the exact right spot to integrate with the steel post that was not going anywhere.  I mean exact to the 16th.  Parts of the of the island ends are false doors and the functional doors are mounted to large pull-outs, similar to a trash unit.   The drawers were new at the time, Legrabox, with a push to open mechanism.  No hardware was a mandate, and part of the fun here was that someone new to the space would likely have a hard time opening the cabinets.  On the sink side lower cabinets, we used a “J” channel mounted directly to the doors.  There is a close-up of the channel in the gallery, with a dark grey Legrabox pull-out in the background (these also come in a stainless finish for about $40 more per drawer).  There is another bridge over the sink area and this was mounted to the ceiling from behind to prevent drooping.  Also on those uppers are aluminum framed doors with a matching, frosted white glass insert.  The transition from shiny to satin on these faces is a nice, subtle touch. The last tricky bit is the Miele appliances.  I need to things to fit correctly and demand tight reveals.  There was a lot of time spent on the layout of the oven cabinet.  The oven also requires a venting “chimney” of sorts up from the bottom, and out the top of the cabinet.  Last point is that the Miele brand is metric and doesn’t conform to American standards, so make sure your cabinet person gets this!  I don’t pat myself on the back often, but one strength of mine is effective communication.  Jobs like this require as much time planning and discussing as they do “working”.  I get what the client is after and can readily explain how and why things should be (or need to be) done.